Warren Diamond
May 15, 2017 07:29PM
I visit Medal of Honor Recipient Turney White Leonard's grave site at Grove Hill Cemetery often and drive by a magnificent mausoleum with the name "DIAMOND" displayed above the door. Curiosity as to who may be interred there found that it was erected at the order of Warren Diamond.

This brought to mind something told to me by a deceased attorney friend who lived in Highland Park. As we would drive down Armstrong Parkway, he would always say, "look for Warren's ghost" as we passed the 4200 block. He would claim that it had been seen wandering around a home.

I think he obtained his knowledge from his children who related the ghost story.

I found some information regarding Warren Diamond, sometimes indicating he may have been involved in some questionable pursuits. I did learn he died as a result of a gunshot wound at his home, which was indeed in the 4200 block Armstrong Parkway in Highland Park, ruled as a suicide.

Anybody have any history regarding Mr. Diamond and his family?



I am not completely useless, I can always be used as a bad example.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/16/2017 03:41AM by DallasCop2566.
Re: Warren Diamond
May 16, 2017 07:24AM
DallasCop2566 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I visit Medal of Honor Recipient Turney White
> Leonard's grave site at Grove Hill Cemetery often
> and drive by a magnificent mausoleum with the
> name "DIAMOND" displayed above the door.
> Curiosity as to who may be interred there found
> that it was erected at the order of Warren
> Diamond.
>
> This brought to mind something told to me by a
> deceased attorney friend who lived in Highland
> Park. As we would drive down Armstrong Parkway,
> he would always say, "look for Warren's ghost" as
> we passed the 4200 block. He would claim that it
> had been seen wandering around a home.


> I think he obtained his knowledge from his
> children who related the ghost story.
>
> I found some information regarding Warren Diamond,
> sometimes indicating he may have been involved in
> some questionable pursuits. I did learn he died
> as a result of a gunshot wound at his home, which
> was indeed in the 4200 block Armstrong Parkway in
> Highland Park, ruled as a suicide.
>
> Anybody have any history regarding Mr. Diamond and
> his family?
>
>
Re: Warren Diamond
May 16, 2017 08:18AM
Well, I keep trying to get this posted. Something isn't working right. Maybe this time will be the charm.

According to numerous secondary sources on the internet (here are a couple:

[www.findagrave.com]

[www.texasmonthly.com] )

Diamond's remains are in that mausoleum. Numerous sources state that Benny Binion got into the gambling business under employment and tutelage by Warren Diamond, who was reputed to be the mob boss and most significant gambling business owner of the early 20th century in Dallas. Questions remain as to whether his death was a suicide or a competitor's hit. Binion?

Added in edit: Despite his unsavory associations and activities, Diamond's funeral was officiated by, and attended by, persons of sterling reputation, and he was given honors by the city at various times.

Dave McNeely



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/16/2017 10:30AM by old man from dallas.
Re: Warren Diamond
May 16, 2017 06:11PM
I was finally able to sign in to the Dallas Morning News Archive via the Dallas Public Library Internet site and read several articles regarding Warren Diamond's death. All more or less state he was hospitalized at St. Paul Sanitorium and walked out, returned to his home, went directly to a second floor bathroom and apparently shot himself. The articles described health issues and some business setbacks as probable cause of his ruled suicide in August 1932.

I will continue to research Mr. Diamond, appears to be a very interesting person and family.

One article discovered disclosed the cost of the mausoleum at Grove Hill cemetery was $65,000.00 and was patterned after a mausoleum located in Bridgeport, Connecticut admired by Mr. Diamond.

There are several articles regarding family disputes regarding Mr. Diamond's estate and an article from 1938 discloses there was insufficient funds to pay an outstanding tax bill for real estate owned by Mr. Diamond in the City of Dallas.

In the majority of the articles regarding Mr. Diamond, he is described as "Local Wealthy Sportsman".

I am not completely useless, I can always be used as a bad example.
Re: Warren Diamond
May 16, 2017 06:57PM
DallasCop2566 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I was finally able to sign in to the Dallas
> Morning News Archive via the Dallas Public Library
> Internet site and read several articles regarding
> Warren Diamond's death. All more or less state he
> was hospitalized at St. Paul Sanitorium and walked
> out, returned to his home, went directly to a
> second floor bathroom and apparently shot himself.
> The articles described health issues and some
> business setbacks as probable cause of his ruled
> suicide in August 1932.
>
> I will continue to research Mr. Diamond, appears
> to be a very interesting person and family.
>
> One article discovered disclosed the cost of the
> mausoleum at Grove Hill cemetery was $65,000.00
> and was patterned after a mausoleum located in
> Bridgeport, Connecticut admired by Mr. Diamond.
>
> There are several articles regarding family
> disputes regarding Mr. Diamond's estate and an
> article from 1938 discloses there was insufficient
> funds to pay an outstanding tax bill for real
> estate owned by Mr. Diamond in the City of
> Dallas.
>
> In the majority of the articles regarding Mr.
> Diamond, he is described as "Local Wealthy
> Sportsman".

Thanks, I have not seen the DMN articles you referred to. The scenario it describes sounds like something that could have happened. Perhaps the internet articles I read were simply sensationalizing the life of a man who was involved in mob activity.

Wasn't "sportsman" at one time a commonly used euphemism for professional gambler or one who worked at other marginal occupations?

Dave McNeely
Re: Warren Diamond
May 16, 2017 07:15PM
I am very curious to the term "Sportsman". I have seen it used in other newspaper articles regarding other questionable persons. I remember seeing the term in an article regarding the death of Mildred Noble, a result of a car bomb, wife of Herbert "The Cat" Noble, another very interesting character.

I worked off duty security at the Baker Hotel in the early seventies before it was demolished. The hotel had a security person that was elderly and had some health issues and was forced to retire. Before his departure and after learning he was a former Deputy Sheriff under Sheriff Smoot
Schmid, we talked often about the World War II era in Dallas and all the major characters involved in the gambling and other somewhat illegal activities taking place due to the influx of military men. He often talked of being lucky that he was assigned to the New Hope, Rose Hill and Polly areas and seldom worked the City of Dallas area.

I was always curious to the naming of a roadway near Lake Ray Hubbard, Polly Road and I assume it was named after a community located in the area.

I am not completely useless, I can always be used as a bad example.
Re: Warren Diamond
May 17, 2017 11:06AM
As a kid, I remember my grandmother in Oklahoma alluding to a "sportin' man" as a gambler, a marginal crook, and a denizen of bawdy houses and bars. My uncle John(her son) was a bootlegger and a sportin' man in the 30s. He did, however, serve well in the army in WW2 as the company boxer and a sergeant FAO. Jim
Re: Warren Diamond
May 21, 2017 08:18PM
At a presentation by author Jim Gatewood several years ago I recall he made mention of Warren Diamond. In checking the indexes of several of his books I see references to Diamond in almost all but haven't looked into the details.

A better researched book, in my opinion, is Gary Sleeper's "I'll Do My Own Dammed Killin' - Benny Binion, Herbert Noble, and the Texas Gambling War."

Gary wrote that by 1930 Diamond had abandoned all his policy business leaving Binion to take control of all of Dallas. His suicide was attributed to being consumed by cancer and despondent. Gary's book contains numerous mentions of Diamond who he describes as the "Highest of Dallas high rollers, who never refused a bet." One instance at one of his crap tables in the St George Hotel, Diamond accepted an envelope from an east Texas oil operator, which he did not examine. It was only after the oilman crapped out that Diamond opened the envelope to find 171 thousand dollar bills stuffed inside.
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