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Early Medical education in Dallas

Posted by SAV 
SAV
Early Medical education in Dallas
April 09, 2016 03:58PM
What school - or schools - were granting MD degrees in Dallas in 1908?
Re: Early Medical education in Dallas
April 10, 2016 04:29PM
SAV---

According to the Handbook of Texas Online:

"The University of Dallas Medical Department (founded three years earlier) became the Baylor University College of Medicine, and in 1909 the new Texas Baptist Memorial Sanitarium became the primary teaching hospital for this medical school. UTMB and Baylor were the only two medical schools in Texas between the second decade of the century and 1949. "

The 1949 date, by the way, doesn't quite jibe with the published history of UT Southwestern, which says that their precursor was founded n 1943.
SAV
Re: Early Medical education in Dallas
April 11, 2016 07:42AM
Southwestern Medical School was a result of many of the Dallas Baylor faculty not wanting to move to Houston in 1943.
I also have a vague recollection that very early on SMU had some sort of medical school. There was a presentation to that effect at one of the Legacies History Conferences some years ago.
Re: Early Medical education in Dallas
April 11, 2016 10:31AM
SAV Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Southwestern Medical School was a result of many
> of the Dallas Baylor faculty not wanting to move
> to Houston in 1943.
> I also have a vague recollection that very early
> on SMU had some sort of medical school. There was
> a presentation to that effect at one of the
> Legacies History Conferences some years
> ago.

Why did Baylor move the medical school to Houston? I've known that it happened, but never known why.

Dave McNeely
Re: Early Medical education in Dallas
April 11, 2016 11:09AM
SAV might be interested in these articles from the Spring 1993 issue of Legacies: "Educating Doctors in Dallas," and "Letters from a Dallas Medical Student, 1904-07."

As far as Dave's question, the "Educating Doctors in Dallas" article treats Baylor's move briefly. Baylor in Dallas was having money problems serious enough to threaten its accreditation. Baylor's denominational influence narrowed its ability to raise money in Dallas, and the school often found itself overlooked by purseholders in Waco. According to the article's author, the school was "too far from home, and in a big town with few friends."

Rusty
Re: Early Medical education in Dallas
April 11, 2016 06:11PM
RWilliams Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> SAV might be interested in these articles from the
> Spring 1993 issue of Legacies: "Educating Doctors
> in Dallas," and "Letters from a Dallas Medical
> Student, 1904-07."
>
> As far as Dave's question, the "Educating Doctors
> in Dallas" article treats Baylor's move briefly.
> Baylor in Dallas was having money problems serious
> enough to threaten its accreditation. Baylor's
> denominational influence narrowed its ability to
> raise money in Dallas, and the school often found
> itself overlooked by purseholders in Waco.
> According to the article's author, the school was
> "too far from home, and in a big town with few
> friends."
>
> Rusty

Thanks Rusty, I have since read several articles online, and it seems that the denominational affiliation was paramount, and even remained a problem for the school until total separation from the Baptists years later. The Texas Baptist Convention (may have the name off a bit) was leery of the school attempting to court sectarian and or government funding, and the state of Texas was reluctant to fund a church affiliated institution. The move from Dallas to Houston was prompted by an invitation to join the new Medical Center in Houston which would broaden funding as well as research and practice opportunities given such institutions as MD Anderson (also a part of the new Medical Center). Then when the total separation from the Baptists occurred later, the state began kicking in enough money to double the enrollment while maintaining tuition at the same rate as state medical schools. So, Baylor is sort of a state institution, though not governed by the state.

From my reading, the consideration for establishing the new medical school in Dallas was not because faculty were reluctant to move to Houston (though they may have been), but because given that Baylor was leaving, there was demand for a medical school in Dallas.

Dave McNeely



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 04/11/2016 07:39PM by old man from dallas.
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