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Bends in rivers

Posted by jgoodman 
Re: Bends in rivers
January 07, 2018 04:36PM
Jim, you are correct, Buffalo is bony. The lateral ribs (intermuscular bones) are thin and pointed. If the fillet is removed correctly, the muscle above the lateral septum is free of bones, and can be prepared as for any fish fillet. The bony portions, especially for large individuals, my mother used to pressure can and we used them like canned salmon, making fish cakes of them. Also, if a whole fish is baked, the fillet will lift from the bones like any other fish fillet. Trout and salmon have these bones, also, and the same principles apply to their preparation.

Both smallmouth and largemouth buffalo are farmed, typically in mixed culture with catfish. The primary market for them fresh has generally been to African Americans. If you have eaten frozen fish products like "fish sticks," there is a good probability that you have eaten buffalo, along with carp, goldfish (yes, the same species as commonly kept as pets), and other so called "rough fish." Most of the harvest for processing, especially before aquaculture, has been from the Great Lakes and the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers.

Dave McNeely
Re: Bends in rivers
January 08, 2018 10:34AM
Chuck, if you want to take a chance on those, I think you'll find that they are (if actually buffalo) quite mild and tasty, though as Jim said, they are bony. It sounds like what is offered is filleted. If so, and if the purveyers are honest merchants, they might tell you if the fillets are bony or boneless. If boneless, they should also have bony portions for sale at a lesser price perhaps.

Many kinds of fish that have a reputation as not being good to eat are in fact quite good. Before aquaculture became the major source of much of America's commercially offered fish, northerners generally would not eat catfish, calling it a "scavenger" and contending that that made it poor table fare. Even today, some feel that way, though they've never tasted it. The same applies to carp, gar, and most suckers including buffalo. Carpsucker, however, I can attest is very strong tasting though not oily.

Dave McNeely
Re: Bends in rivers
February 05, 2018 05:38PM
I'll be driving over to Corsicana early tomorrow for a Dr. appt.,, and will see if any fish stands are open.
It's really cold here now and doubt if anybody is fishing..
I'm already ready for Spring!
Re: Bends in rivers
February 06, 2018 12:18PM
No one should be eating any fish in the Trinity from Benbrook Lake in Fort Worth downstream to Richland Chambers Reservoir at the 287 bridge. That 150 mile stretch is too polluted to consume fish per TCEQ regulations. Humans should not consume any species of fish from these waters.
Re: Bends in rivers
February 07, 2018 07:53AM
I've been aware that fish from the Trinity here in Dallas have been considered toxic and possibly parasite infested. The citizens of Joppa in southeastern Dallas Co. have caught and consumed such fish for a long time. It would be interesting to see if there have been any endemic illness/genetic disturbance in that population. Jim



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/07/2018 01:29PM by jgoodman.
Re: Bends in rivers
February 15, 2018 07:38AM
Ben S. Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Campbell Loughmiller and a canoe full of kids made
> a successful navigation of the Trinity River
> starting at Camp Woodland Springs near the present
> day corner of Jim Miller and Loop 12....all the
> way to Trinity Bay in June of 1954.
>
> Might be a shade easier these days since the river
> has been straightened out in spots and the snags
> are probably not as bad.
>
> A solid predictable flow of water during a wetter
> than normal year would probably prove to be the
> best option. Once you get past Trinidad, Texas,
> the river widens somewhat and the snags and
> problematic locks are not an issue.
>
> Best way to run it would likely be in a canoe or
> very small jon boat with a motor. Purists might
> not like the idea but it would sure get you past
> some mighty boring river miles.

Getting past Lake Livingston would be a great effort while paddling, or even with a small motor, then there would be the portage around the dam.

Dave McNeely
Re: Bends in rivers
February 15, 2018 02:51PM
Ben S. Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> No one should be eating any fish in the Trinity
> from Benbrook Lake in Fort Worth downstream to
> Richland Chambers Reservoir at the 287 bridge.
> That 150 mile stretch is too polluted to consume
> fish per TCEQ regulations. Humans should not
> consume any species of fish from these waters.

Agreed, absolutely. Interestingly, a few years ago, while the notice regarding fish from the Trinity was in effect, TPWD was stocking, a put and take program, rainbow trout in certain sections of the Trinity within the limits cited by Ben. Questions were asked, and the answer was that the fish came from a hatchery in Arkansas, and were not expected to stay in the river long enough to acquire enough toxins to be problematic. When further questions were asked regarding microbial contaminants, the answer was to cook the fish thoroughly.

I thought this was irresponsible on the part of TPWD. I think the practice has been discontinued, though the department continues to stock fish in other urban waters that may be a bit iffy, mainly for the kid's fishing program.

I suspect that the fish that Chuck has seen for sale along Hwy 31 were caught in Cedar Creek Lake.

Dave McNeely



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/15/2018 02:52PM by old man from dallas.
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