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The original location of Titche-Goettinger

Posted by ladarron 
The original location of Titche-Goettinger
November 20, 2010 09:51AM
Here's some pics of the flagship Titche-Goettinger Department Store at the Wilson Building, before the move to the Titche-Goettinger Building in 1929.
When Titche's moved out two stores moved in, W.A. Green Department Store and H.L. Green Variety Store. W.A. Green moved into the Titche's tower space and H.L. Green moved into the lower floors of the main building. When W.A Green moved out in 1961, H.L. Green took over the space. H.L. Green closed in 1997.




Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
November 20, 2010 12:54PM
Thanks for posting; the first picture in the series is the first time I have actually seen the Crystal Theater. Originally opened in 1911 at 1608 Elm by G.K. Jorgensen, who operated an early Texas theater chain based in Galveston, and built before the trend of film theaters being located on the north side of Elm was firmly established.
Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
November 21, 2010 05:38AM
Just got off google maps, looking at this same block in street view - wonder if it (Crystal Theater) could be the same building as is there today. Details are different, and the building now touches the side of the old Titche's building (Wilson Building), but facades can be altered. Any architecture experts (or non-experts who may just KNOW) out there care to weigh in?
Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
November 21, 2010 05:49AM
Here's some pics of the Crystal Theatre


Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
November 21, 2010 05:51AM
I did the same thing Matthew. The number and placement of the windows are the same too as is the height of the building.

On further looking the building we think may have been the theater now has a donut shop in the east end of it. The rest of the building between the donut shop and the Wilson building has a separate roof. Its as though , at some later date, the two one story buildings between the theater and the Wilson Building were torn down and a single two story building built in their place and a common matching facade added to the front of both remaining buildings. There is also one of those vent grates in the sidewalk in front of the theater and there is one in what seems to be the same location in front of the donut shop.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/21/2010 06:33AM by Wayne Pritchett.
Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
November 21, 2010 11:10AM
Could be, Wayne, but they need to move that UPS truck and that danged minivan so we can be sure!!!

Seriously, the question in my mind was, "Why tear down a perfectly good building just to put up another that looks almost exactly like the one you tore down?"

If they actually did that, then it seems (assuming the original bldg was old enough for it's razing to be "justified"winking smiley architectural styles would have changed more drastically during the lifespan of the original bldg - and I don't think "retro" was even thought of back then, at least not in Dallas (they tore down so much that was still useful just because it wasn't "new", I mean REALLY).

Easier just to re-do the facade, like they did with so many of the old movie theaters along Elm back in the day - have you ever seen photos that document how drastically they altered original Palace facade to give it that faintly Moorish tower motif (changing it from brick to stucco in the process) or the Old Mill to turn it into the Rialto in 1935, or the way they altered the Hippodrome when they turned it into the Joy (then the Wade, then the Downtown, then the Strand)?

I think we probably still have the old Crystal.
Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
November 22, 2010 03:07AM
According to this article in the Dallas Morning News (1926), the old Crystal Theater building was remodeled/expanded (but not demolished) when the theater's lease ran out.





Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 11/22/2010 03:16AM by dfwcre8tive.
Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
November 22, 2010 10:03AM
Very interesting, dfwcre8tive. W.G. Underwood held the lease on the Crystal, eh? He was the Underwood in Underwood & Ezell, which operated walk-ins and drive-ins around Texas for decades. Thanks for posting.

And McCrory was the old 5-and-dime chain, weren't they?
Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
November 22, 2010 11:18AM
McCrory wound up owning HL Green and had their district headquarters in the Wilson Building up to the closing of Greens.
Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
December 01, 2010 12:18PM
On the Crystal Building commentary, as a kid I recall another similarly-geometric facade which I'd place across the street: MagicLand, which was not a theater, adjacent to where the Capri would've been. Which suddenly reminds me of a mysterious walkthrough on the other side (at the end of Stone Place was Meisterhans' Beer Garden once upon a time) with a plaque "This Way to the Biltmore" which was not the hotel, but an old garage. Anyone remember that yellow building MagicLand was in, c. 1970?
Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
December 01, 2010 02:49PM
On the same side as, or across from, the Capri?
Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
December 01, 2010 02:49PM
so did you get permission from the library to post these?
Re: The original location of Titche-Goettinger
December 01, 2010 08:07PM
The Titche-Goettinger Department Store, formed in 1902 by Max Goettinger and Edward Titche, opened on the southeast corner of Elm and Murphy streets. Two years later, they moved in the relatively new Wilson Building, between Main and Elm Streets, against Ervay Street. In 1928 the company began construction on a new location between Main and Elm Streets at St. Paul Street to house increased depth in their merchandise such as ready-to-wear apparel. In December 1928, before the new building was complete, Titche-Goettinger was sold to Hahn Department Stores. (Hahn would also purchase San Antonio, Texas, retailer Joske's the same year.) The Great Depression affected the breadth of the retail market during Hahn's ownership, changing the market from an upper-income clientele to a middle-income one. The store's competitive edge was largely lost to Neiman Marcus. In 1932, Hahn Department Stores changed its name to Allied Stores Corporation. The change in ownership and shifting clientele probably prevented the company from opening branch locations between 1930 and 1960. The company continued its support for and commitment to downtown retailing until the 1960s.
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