Re: Fuller Brush man and the Pony Man
February 19, 2011 02:20AM
I remember the pony man who took the pictures.Don't remember ever having my picture made though. That probably cost a whole QUARTER or so and we could not afford such luxiries. Do remember seeing the next door nieghbors Pony Photo on their piano. My fondest memories include a 1948 Advance design Chevy One Ton Pick Up Truck loaded with watermelons driving down our street. It had an old brake drum that hung off of the rear view mirror arm and the driver would clang that old brake drum with a large piece of steel and sing out "WAAATERMELLLON"..... Our home was on old Grove Street right in front of that mound of dirt that MorrowMustang Talked about that the Machine Guns were fired at from the Mustangs or P-51's on Love Field. The Metzgers Dairies Milk Trucks and the Ice Man had Horse Drawn "C" Cab trucks that later were mounted on truck chassiss.
Also remember the Insurance man that gave out the little packets of Needles I think was American National or? The vacumn Cleaner salesmen that I remember were the FILTER QUEEN brand



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 02/19/2011 05:41AM by triumphleroy.
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
March 02, 2011 06:59PM
JRC said (mid-post)
<<...We covered his territory about three times in the same time he did it alone once. He sold about twice as much as he had previously. Fuller Brush was thrilled with this pilot program. They envisioned doubling their sales all over Dallas. They went out and hired a legion of teens to do this and the program promptly fell on its face. Most of the other boys would toss the stuff down the sewer drains and tell the man that nobody was at home and collect their wages. ...>>

This just made me think of a fellow who came up to my house off of Ross Ave years ago wanting to paint my house number on the cement steps visible to the street. He wouldn't take the money until after he completed it. $4.00, excellent job, done immediately in minutes, and he was gone. For good. He looked homeless but wasn't begging or intimidating. (And in that location, I experienced both and worse for nearly 30 years). I seriously considered going into the number painting business myself (think about it ... a set of stencils and some spray paint) but my boyfriend encouraged canvassing neighborhoods and leaving flyers, business cards and contact numbers for making appointments. Buzz kill. I like simple. I like to think that fellow made good.
Re: Fuller Brush man and the Pony Man
March 19, 2011 07:49PM
I have a photograph of my mother taken by "The Pony Man", Crawford Street in Oak Cliff approximately 1934. There was a good thread on this board about ten years ago. Lost in the flood.
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
October 29, 2011 02:34PM
A different type of door to door - I delivered mail during my college summers - out of Inwood Station. This included the traditionally black neighborhood over by Love Field. (It also included Ross Perot before he moved into a really big house.) I recall seeing a guy drive up in a big Cadillac. The women in the neighborhood came out and he opened his trunk. It was filled with live chickens which he then sold. This was 1966 0r 67! I suppose people pay a premium for chicken that fresh today. Progress or...?
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
October 29, 2011 02:34PM
A different type of door to door - I delivered mail during my college summers - out of Inwood Station. This included the traditionally black neighborhood over by Love Field. (It also included Ross Perot before he moved into a really big house.) I recall seeing a guy drive up in a big Cadillac. The women in the neighborhood came out and he opened his trunk. It was filled with live chickens which he then sold. This was 1966 0r 67! I suppose people pay a premium for chicken that fresh today. Progress or...?
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
October 29, 2011 03:40PM
Pony man
Fuller Brush
Watkins
Knife sharpening man

We had Metzger's milk delivered and he drove a white horse pulled wagon. That must have been around 1950.

The ice man was my favorite. He wore a leather cape so he could carry the block of ice over his shoulder. I wanted to be an ice man when I grew up so I could wear a cape.
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
November 26, 2011 07:11PM
BillB, you could've settled for being a superhero! But you would've had to wear your underwear on the outside of your clothes! - come to think of it, I think our iceman did that...once.
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
November 27, 2011 05:28AM
I remember my Aunt (Maudie Tumey) having Fuller Brush parties when they lived on Mount Rainier back in the mid to late 1940's, my Mother would drag me over there, pretty boring at the time for a young kid......Bill Strouse
Re: Fuller Brush man and the Pony Man
April 12, 2012 08:05AM
We lived on Normandy in the 1950s and I well remember the knife and scissor sharperner pulling (or was it pushing) his cart right down the middle of the street. I was in elementary school so do not remember whether he sharpened anything for us. Wonder what happened to him and that cart? We moved to Lovers Lane and I remember vividly the Fuller Brush Man visits and purchases: still have the hair brush we bought in the early 1960s from him. Finally, in the for-what-it's-worth category also remember the Lighthouse for the Blind sales folks and buying the hand-made brooms from them. Fond memories.
Re: Fuller Brush man and the Pony Man
April 12, 2012 09:24AM
duplicate error



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/17/2012 01:22PM by brownwg.
Re: Fuller Brush man and the Pony Man
April 12, 2012 09:25AM
We lived on Normandy in the 1950s and I well remember the knife and scissor sharperner pulling (or was it pushing) his cart right down the middle of the street. I was in elementary school so do not remember whether he sharpened anything for us. Wonder what happened to him and that cart? We moved to Lovers Lane and I remember vividly the Fuller Brush Man visits and purchases: still have the hair brush we bought in the early 1960s from him. Finally, in the for-what-it's-worth category also remember the Lighthouse for the Blind sales folks and buying the hand-made brooms from them. Fond memories.
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
April 12, 2012 11:50AM
We lived on Normandy in the 1950s and I well remember the knife and scissor sharperner pulling (or was it pushing) his cart right down the middle of the street. I was in elementary school so do not remember whether he sharpened anything for us. Wonder what happened to him and that cart? We moved to Lovers Lane and I remember vividly the Fuller Brush Man visits and purchases: still have the hair brush we bought in the early 1960s from him. Finally, in the for-what-it's-worth category also remember the Lighthouse for the Blind sales folks and buying the hand-made brooms from them. Fond memories.
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
April 12, 2012 02:32PM
Well, no one has mentioned the most wonderful door to door salesman. That was the MANOR MAN who brought bread, five different kinds, breakfast rolls,( several different kinds) pies, cakes and the best fruit cakes in Texas.
Ralph
JNB
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
April 13, 2012 09:35PM
Reference to the "Pony Man" I don't know if there might have been more that one "Pony Man" but I remember there was one "Pony Man" who came around through the neighborhood to take pictures of kids. He also had a small dog that would sit on the horse's back to pose along with the kid. smiling smiley

And there were street photographers in Downtown Dallas who would take pictures of persons walking down the sidewalk and then sell them to those persons.

There was also Manor Bakers, which had a fleet of delivery trucks and delivered bread and other related proucts door to door.
My apologies to Ralph...I see you already covered that !smiling smiley



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 04/13/2012 09:46PM by JNB.
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
April 14, 2012 09:03AM
I just thought of the Hot Tamale man.

There was one who pushed a cart down my street every day.

That probably expalins why we never saw any stray dogs :-)
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
July 17, 2016 06:12PM
Spent my life from age 0 to 4, until 1951, on Prosper (which I believe is now Linwood) west of Inwood and running south from Lovers. My most memorable "door-to-door" was the Candy Man, whom walked down the street wearing a wooden tray of candies suspended by a leather strap around his neck. He would sing out "Candeeeeeee Mannnn" and all of the kids would come running with their pennies. Try doing that today and see what happens! But exciting to a little kid.

Native Dallasite, Hillcrest High '65, Texas A&M '71
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
July 19, 2016 02:17PM
This thread brings up so many memories. I have a picture of my 5 year old Grandfather posed sitting on a pony in the yard of his parents' house in East Dallas, c. 1907. Neither of them looks too happy. I also remember seeing the scissors grinder in Highland Park as late as the early 60's, probably on Shenandoah near Golf Dr.
In our neighborhood near Midway and Royal (Disney Streets) we regularly saw the Manor Bread man, the milk man (Bluff View in our case), the Charles Chip man, the Avon lady, the Olin Mills photographer, the egg man who also supplied turkeys for the holidays (I remember my Mother singeing the pin feathers off their wings on a gas burner). There were also people selling magazine subscriptions or huge chocolate bars for school fundraisers, paper boys (and girls) collecting for the Times Herald and Morning News, men from the Lighthouse for the Blind, men selling cords of wood from flat bed trucks, men selling sets of encyclopedias. Of course not every household took advantage of all these services, but the streets seemed busy.
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
July 19, 2016 04:27PM
Girl, So, you had paper girls in your neighborhood. I delivered the Dallas Times Herald from July 1958 until August 1960 in the Bryan Park neighborhood (Live Oak, Bryan Parkway, Swiss Avenue), on Columbia Avenue and East Side Avenue, and along Bryan Street for several blocks either side of Fitzhugh, and the Dallas Morning News from August 1960 until February 1962 in the area around Westmoreland Heights Shopping Center west to Cockrell Hill Road. In all that time I never saw or knew a paper girl. I worked at the Westmoreland Heights A & P for a year, and there were no girls working there, though a couple of adult women worked as cashiers.

I just generally thought that certain jobs were considered "boys jobs" back then. Times have changed. But, we don't have either paper boys or paper girls now. If we get a newspaper by home delivery, an adult drives by in a car and throws the paper in the driveway, on the lawn, in the bushes, or in the street. We were expected to "porch" the paper, and some customers requested that we put it behind the storm door or in some other special place. We always complied. My biggest oops ever as a paper boy was that I threw a paper through a customers picture window. That cost me a couple of month's earnings.

To avoid having to pay us a reasonable wage, the newspaper companies referred to us as contractors. We bought the papers and supplies from the company, and whatever we had left from what we collected after paying was our earnings. That way, we took the risk of customers jilting us rather than the company taking that risk, but that only happened to me on the Columbia-East Side route. So, there I did not offer customers the choice of monthly or weekly pay. Everyone paid weekly or they didn't get the paper. Because I had to buy them, I never used rubber bands for the paper, but folded it so it stayed together when I tossed it. Sometimes I walked my routes, sometimes I rode a bicycle. Walking, I used two paper bags, but riding, I used only one, plus the basket on the front of the bicycle. Those bags were well made, quite strong, of very thick cotton duck cloth. I kept a couple of them for years afterward for hauling various things about.

Dave McNeely
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
July 19, 2016 06:21PM
Not really official paper girls, but my best friend and I used to throw her brother's Times Herald route when he was at Scout camp. It paid better than baby sitting, which was an approved "girl" job, but only paid .50 an hour.
Re: Fuller Brush man, the Pony Man, and other door-to-door salesmen
July 19, 2016 07:14PM
northdallasgirl Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> This thread brings up so many memories. I have a
> picture of my 5 year old Grandfather posed sitting
> on a pony in the yard of his parents' house in
> East Dallas, c. 1907. Neither of them looks too
> happy. I also remember seeing the scissors
> grinder in Highland Park as late as the early
> 60's, probably on Shenandoah near Golf Dr.
> In our neighborhood near Midway and Royal (Disney
> Streets) we regularly saw the Manor Bread man, the
> milk man (Bluff View in our case), the Charles
> Chip man, the Avon lady, the Olin Mills
> photographer, the egg man who also supplied
> turkeys for the holidays (I remember my Mother
> singeing the pin feathers off their wings on a gas
> burner). There were also people selling magazine
> subscriptions or huge chocolate bars for school
> fundraisers, paper boys (and girls) collecting for
> the Times Herald and Morning News, men from the
> Lighthouse for the Blind, men selling cords of
> wood from flat bed trucks, men selling sets of
> encyclopedias. Of course not every household took
> advantage of all these services, but the streets
> seemed busy.

A bit off-topic but we got Charles Chips delivered in Sunnyvale well into the 70s. Also, you can still get Charles Chips in the familiar can on Amazon, plus a replica of the old delivery truck.
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