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Hot Links

Posted by Sonya 
Hot Links
December 18, 2008 07:20AM
Anyone interested in finding Pittsburg Hot Links....
www.pittsburghotlink.com for restaurant info.
www.pittsburghotlinks.net for a supplier near you
Previous post compare to Rudolph, Cadel, Campbell. Pittsburg Brand Hot Links are the original Hot Links served in East Texas for over 100 years.
awh
Re: Hot Links
December 19, 2008 08:32PM
I miss Franklin's in Pittsburgh!
Didn't want to know what was in them - I just knew I liked them!
Thanks!
Re: Hot Links
January 28, 2013 07:59AM
Can`t find the big ole red hot links easily found in the 50```s n 60`s 70`s.Hot n spicy.Rudolph`s no longer has them and the pre packaged ones are not the ticket.Don`t mean the short E TX style.Krecks meats? in so.dallas was what I wanted.Found out the old man died and no [known]recipe avail.The best!!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/18/2014 05:46PM by jelly teefo.
bob
Re: Hot Links
January 28, 2013 08:38PM
Best memory of hot links was at Mac's Grocery in Grand Prairie. Just 15 cents. A bag of Fritos for a nickle, and a small can of Bean Dip for 13 cents. Good healthy lunch!
Re: Hot Links
January 28, 2013 08:58PM
Regarding those in Pittsburg a lot of the townsfolk will not touch them. They were/are roughly the size of Vienna sausages...somewhat larger. You could pierce one with the tine of a fork and grease would shoot across the the room. A massive coronary in a dozen! The ones down the Hwy 271 in Gilmer are tasteless if you don't use enough hot sauce My favorites are the big, HOT red ones with Earle Campbell on the label......well, I think it's Earle Campbell. They're probably made in Ohio for all I know. Jim
awh
Re: Hot Links
January 29, 2013 07:15AM
Miss the back of Franklin's in Pittsburgh - The best!





÷÷-----{++}
Re: Hot Links
January 29, 2013 10:57AM
The Pittsburg hot links I remember from the 1960s were those served at Shelton Warrick's emporium. I wouldn't be surprised there'd be a coronary threat in a dozen of them, but a half dozen, well-forked, and a hamburger once in a great while was a cultural experience.
Re: Hot Links
January 29, 2013 11:05AM
awh Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Miss the back of Franklin's in Pittsburgh - The
> best!
>
> [i388.photobucket.com]
> ern/Franklins-doorway-hot-link.jpg
>
> [is0.4sqi.net]
> HfxEflEsAHQ7AwOhmc.jpg

'Twas once common for small grocers to offer lunches and snacks, often sandwiches made to order. The sandwiches might include (in Texas and the South) such fillings as bologna, salami, or other cold cuts. Hard boiled eggs and sometimes other cooked items that required minimal preparation were usual fare as well. These items were usually prepared behind a counter that might be similar to or even would be an old fashioned butcher case. In fact, the person who prepared the sandwiches might also be a butcher who actually broke down a side of beef and trimmed the resultant cuts.

Today, the equivalent is offered in the "convenience stores" that double as gas stations. The trouble is, the equivalent is hot dogs (ok), hot links (yes, they are common, not hard to find at all, not ok), premade sandwiches and other items stored in a cooler and heated by the customer in a microwave. Hot dogs and hot links (and a grade up from the hot links, but not much usually, "Polish sausages," may be rolling on a cooker, with buns stored underneath in a drawer. The customer loads the thing in a bun, and adds such things as "chili" (not), mustard, or relish, often from packets.

This is what has replaced old time stores with friendly (or cranky) personalities working in them.

Yes, in some ways, old times were distinctly better.

Dave McNeely
bug
Re: Hot Links
January 29, 2013 11:52AM
I have been wanting to try those in Gilmer.
My favorites are the unnatural red things.

When in East Texas usually get what Bodacious calls hot links, but they ain't red.
Re: Hot Links
May 19, 2014 04:32PM
I want the Big Red one `s that were hot As Hell,but alas can`t find.
Anonymous User
Re: Hot Links
May 19, 2014 08:50PM
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bug
Re: Hot Links
May 21, 2014 11:10AM
In November we did try Doc's Hot Links in Gilmer.
Greasy, fall apart deliciousness that smears well on crackers.
Re: Hot Links
May 21, 2014 03:17PM
Didn't Walt Garrison sell his hot links once? I know Earl Campbell did and may still.
Re: Hot Links
May 31, 2014 11:56PM
earl campbell hot links are alive and well in minyards and tom thumb in duncanville tx
Re: Hot Links
June 01, 2014 08:15AM
I have a tough gut. All the chili I've ingested over the years bears testament to that fact. However, eat a hot link? Not again, not ever. Once, many years ago was enough. I'd eat a hot dog first, or even what is called chili and sold in cans nowadays.

Dave McNeely
Re: Hot Links
June 01, 2014 08:02PM
Geez, dude, what did it do to you? It sounds as tho' you had a GI catastrophe. Jim
Re: Hot Links
June 02, 2014 07:41AM
Well, getting the thing into my mouth was the first challenge. But I managed that, despite the appearance and aroma of the grilled abomination. Everything that followed was bad.

Dave McNeely
Re: Hot Links
June 03, 2014 11:56AM
old man from dallas Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Well, getting the thing into my mouth was the
> first challenge. But I managed that, despite the
> appearance and aroma of the grilled abomination.
> Everything that followed was bad.


Hot Links are very much an acquired taste, much like tripe and chit'lins or lutefisk if you grew up Norwegian. There also seems to be a LOT of variation in how they are made of and what they are made from. In reading the ingredients list on a package of commecially produced chorizo recently, I found the primary ingredients to be pork salivary glands, lymph nodes and cheek fat. OK, I really like good chorizo but this was just a disgusting mess. Hot Links, like chorizo, suffer greatly from bad ingredients.
Re: Hot Links
June 03, 2014 12:07PM
altozwei Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> old man from dallas Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Well, getting the thing into my mouth was the
> > first challenge. But I managed that, despite
> the
> > appearance and aroma of the grilled abomination.
>
> > Everything that followed was bad.
>
>
> Hot Links are very much an acquired taste, much
> like tripe and chit'lins or lutefisk if you grew
> up Norwegian. There also seems to be a LOT of
> variation in how they are made of and what they
> are made from. In reading the ingredients list on
> a package of commecially produced chorizo
> recently, I found the primary ingredients to be
> pork salivary glands, lymph nodes and cheek fat.
> OK, I really like good chorizo but this was just a
> disgusting mess. Hot Links, like chorizo, suffer
> greatly from bad ingredients.

Another tough to handle (for some) foodstuff is menudo. The best uses honey comb tripe (stomach), but cheaper products use "long tripe" (intestine). It usually is quite oily and loaded with pepper. Besides, I don't like hominy.

Menudo is reputed to be a hangover cure, and is traditionally served for Sunday breakfast. It might be that the traditional saying of, "If it doesn't kill you, it'll cure you," applies.

Dave McNeely
bug
Re: Hot Links
June 03, 2014 12:17PM
Everyone knows that sausage is miscellaneous pig (or whatever) parts.
At least it doesn't have a face, though you may be eating it.
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