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St Joseph Home for Girls

Posted by LGonzales 
St Joseph Home for Girls
April 21, 2006 01:34PM
I'm looking for information & pictures of St. Joseph's Home for Girls. It was located off of S. Madison in Oak Cliff. My mom and Aunt were placed in the home back in the early 40's.
Re: St Joseph Home for Girls
April 21, 2006 08:40PM
If you will use the "search" feature on this board, choose the longest time period, and search for "Virginia E. Johnson home," (all words), you will find a message string with a lot of good information about the St. Joseph's Home (formerly the Virginia Johnson home). I tried to research this for oakcliff.com a year or so ago, and never could come up with a photo. Good luck, and please share whatever else you find with the rest of us!
Re: St Joseph Home for Girls
April 21, 2006 09:07PM
I was in the St. Joseph home for girl's. The home originally started out on the opposite side of I 35 and was quite a bit smaller. In the 1930s, (I Believe) The Catholic church took over the old Virginia K. Johnson home for destitute women. In the mid 70's the home was torn down and replaced by a Catholic Retreat. There are plaques recognizing the girl's on the outside and there are still several statues in the landscape that was there when I was there. The old baseball diamond was still there but not standing all the way up and the Cabana where we spent many Saturday nights eating stale sandwiches is still there.
There have been several inquiries about the home and unfortunately, there isn't much on the Internet about it. The Orphanages was the start of the Catholic Charities and when you go into their website, they recognize the children, first thing. You can go to the Catholic Diocese and can go through the archives. They have pictures, names and much more info. I haven't gone yet, but will someday.
I've asked another board member to post the pictures I have because I'm pretty computer illiterate. I started asking about St. Joseph's on this board some time ago and in the 3 or 4 years I've been posting (Off and On), I've received 3 responses. One from another lady that was there and 2 from men who were in the Dunne Memorial Home. It seems none of them have been able to get much information.
If I can help you, let me know. I was there in the 60's so I can't tell you what it was like before then. It wasn't an abuse center like so many think it was in the catholic church. I actually have fond memories of my time there.
Let me know if I can help and good luck.
Vicki
THe DPL'y might have a photo. Just call the 7th floor and ask 'um.. They have tons of old Dallas photos there.............
I grew up in that neighborhood and used to pass the home on the way to John F. Peeler school. Mrs. Johnson started the school for unwed mothers. Following is an article from the Handbook of Texas Online about her.
JOHNSON, VIRGINIA KNIGHT (1843-1934). Virginia K. Johnson, religious and social worker, daughter of William F. and Eliza (Woodruff) Knight, was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1843 and reared in Pike County, Missouri. During the Civil Warqv she was arrested and imprisoned as a Confederate sympathizer. In 1872 she married William Hudson Johnson. The couple moved to Brownwood, Texas, where he became a county judge. In 1880 they moved to Dallas, where William Johnson opened a law practice and later became city attorney. After his death in 1890 Virginia became active in literary and music clubs, as well as in United Charities fund drives. She was a member of the First Methodist Church and president of the Central Circle of the missionary society, the King's Daughters.
In 1893 a plea for help from a well-known Dallas prostitute inspired Virginia Johnson to lead the King's Daughters in opening a home called Sheltering Arms, a haven for women under the age of twenty-two and in danger of resorting to prostitution for lack of other means of support. In 1896 she founded and edited the King's Messenger, a quarterly magazine for donors, friends, and supporters of rescue work. By its second issue 5,000 copies were printed, and advertisements were included from a wide variety of businesses. The periodical continued publication until 1934.
In 1897 Sheltering Arms expanded to house sixty women and was renamed the Ann Browder Cunningham Home, after the donor of the homesite. Virginia Johnson was superintendent. The home offered shelter to unwed mothers as well as to prostitutes who wished to change their lives, but the institution became inadequate within a decade and closed in 1911. By that year Virginia Johnson had raised the money to purchase an eighteen-acre campus in Oak Cliff on which to build a $75,000, three-story brick structure, the Virginia K. Johnson Home and Training School. With accommodations for 200 young women, the school offered a general education, religious and Bible instruction, courses in basic homemaking, and vocational training in dressmaking, millinery, and nursing. After 1915 the school's curriculum included typing, bookkeeping, and stenography. The Johnson Home was soon accepting applicants from unwed mothers and prostitutes from the entire South. It continued to operate until 1941, when new Texas laws forbade the requirement that residents stay for at least two years. Virginia Johnson helped to raise money for Virginia K. Johnson Hall at Southern Methodist University, and she successfully solicited funds and the land for Smith-Carroll Hall, the Methodist dormitory at the Texas College for Women (now Texas Woman's University) in Denton. She died in Dallas on July 20, 1934.
BIBLIOGRAPHY: Dallas Morning News, July 21, 1934. Elizabeth York Enstam, "Virginia K. Johnson: A Second Chance for the Wayward," Heritage News, Summer 1985. History of Woman's Work in the North Texas Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (Dallas: History Committee of the Woman's Missionary Society, 1929). Olin W. Nail, ed., History of Texas Methodism, 1900-1960 (Austin, 1961).
I found a photo of the home in the Library of Congress website. I will have to search for the URL.
Hello everyone,
I recently acquired a wonderful old reference entitled, _Texas Methodist and Centennial Yearbook: 1834 - 1934_. This book contains a photograph of a large, frame structure, which is captioned, "The Ann Browder Cunningham Mission Home and Training School, Dallas, Texas." Perhaps it depicts the building(s) previous to the brick housing raised through the efforts of Mrs. Johnson. Further construction appears to have been going on at the time when the photograph was taken. Beneath the caption is found:
"This home was founded for unfortunate girls in 1893. In 1895 it became a Methodist institution, being under the control of the Northwest and East Texas Home Mission Conference Societies. In 1898, it was transferred to the Woman's Board of Home Missions. Mrs. Virginia K. Johnson became the financial agent and the home later became the Virginia K. Johnson Home that is still rendering such noble service." (page 82)
I scanned the photograph, which, unfortunately, did not transfer well via a 'jpeg' image. Here is a link to it:
[usera.imagecave.com]
Holly
Good find, Holly!! The photo and caption turned out great on your photo site.
Does anyone on this thread know where this Home/Training center was located? I've re-read the postings and didn't find the location mentioned, other than one indicating it had switched sides relative to I-35.
Fred
Re: Cunningham - Johnson Home
April 22, 2006 05:39PM
Holly, that is the first home that Virginia Johnson. It was years later that she acquired the land that eventually became the St. Joseph's Home for Girls. Here's the story.
JOHNSON, VIRGINIA KNIGHT (1843-1934). Virginia K. Johnson, religious and social worker, daughter of William F. and Eliza (Woodruff) Knight, was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1843 and reared in Pike County, Missouri. During the Civil Warqv she was arrested and imprisoned as a Confederate sympathizer. In 1872 she married William Hudson Johnson. The couple moved to Brownwood, Texas, where he became a county judge. In 1880 they moved to Dallas, where William Johnson opened a law practice and later became city attorney. After his death in 1890 Virginia became active in literary and music clubs, as well as in United Charities fund drives. She was a member of the First Methodist Church and president of the Central Circle of the missionary society, the King's Daughters.
In 1893 a plea for help from a well-known Dallas prostitute inspired Virginia Johnson to lead the King's Daughters in opening a home called Sheltering Arms, a haven for women under the age of twenty-two and in danger of resorting to prostitution for lack of other means of support. In 1896 she founded and edited the King's Messenger, a quarterly magazine for donors, friends, and supporters of rescue work. By its second issue 5,000 copies were printed, and advertisements were included from a wide variety of businesses. The periodical continued publication until 1934.
In 1897 Sheltering Arms expanded to house sixty women and was renamed the Ann Browder Cunningham Home, after the donor of the homesite. Virginia Johnson was superintendent. The home offered shelter to unwed mothers as well as to prostitutes who wished to change their lives, but the institution became inadequate within a decade and closed in 1911. By that year Virginia Johnson had raised the money to purchase an eighteen-acre campus in Oak Cliff on which to build a $75,000, three-story brick structure, the Virginia K. Johnson Home and Training School. With accommodations for 200 young women, the school offered a general education, religious and Bible instruction, courses in basic homemaking, and vocational training in dressmaking, millinery, and nursing. After 1915 the school's curriculum included typing, bookkeeping, and stenography. The Johnson Home was soon accepting applicants from unwed mothers and prostitutes from the entire South. It continued to operate until 1941, when new Texas laws forbade the requirement that residents stay for at least two years. Virginia Johnson helped to raise money for Virginia K. Johnson Hall at Southern Methodist University, and she successfully solicited funds and the land for Smith-Carroll Hall, the Methodist dormitory at the Texas College for Women (now Texas Woman's University) in Denton. She died in Dallas on July 20, 1934.
BIBLIOGRAPHY: Dallas Morning News, July 21, 1934. Elizabeth York Enstam, "Virginia K. Johnson: A Second Chance for the Wayward," Heritage News, Summer 1985. History of Woman's Work in the North Texas Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (Dallas: History Committee of the Woman's Missionary Society, 1929). Olin W. Nail, ed., History of Texas Methodism, 1900-1960 (Austin, 1961).
Elizabeth York Enstam
Re: Cunningham - Johnson Home
April 22, 2006 05:45PM
Fred, the home was located on the corner of Page St. and Madison. You can go there now and the catholic retreat is there. Even though it's surrounded by a fence, the public is welcome to walk the grounds if they wish. There is still some things there that were there then, and don't anyone bother to go in and ask questions at the retreat. I did and they didn't even know there had been a home there. That's when I called the Diocese to ask questions. They did say that the girls who were housed there could go in and go through the archives and look at pictures and documents.
Hi Fred and Vicki,
I didn't delve deeply enough into the Texas Methodist 'Yearbook' previously. Also featured in this volume are small photos of the (masonry) Virginia K. Johnson Home and Training School, as well as the C. C. Young Home for Aged Women (also located in Dallas). As there is no copyright on this work very generously compiled and produced all those years ago (1934 ... but not really SO long ago!), here is a link to these pictures. Hopefully, they will suffice as a glimpse till those interested are able to probe the archives for clearer photos of either home.
Thanks, also, for sharing the information about Saint Joseph's, Vicki.
[usera.imagecave.com]
Sincerely,
Holly
Thanks, Vicki. I've got it spotted, now, just a block West of Zang and a few blocks West of the Zoo.
Would ONE of the locations possibly be the "Catholic Home Grounds" shown at the upper right of this map from Jim Wheat's site??
[freepages.history.rootsweb.com]
Fred
Re: Cunningham - Johnson Home
April 23, 2006 09:49AM
Wow Holly. That's a great picture and that is the home that later became the St. Joseph's Orphanage and then Home for Girl's. Of course, the landscaping was much better when I was there but this is the building. Thanks, that's the best picture I've seen so far.
Vicki
I can remember visiting the C.C. Young home, in about 1960, when it was brick structure several stories tall, near the Methodist Hospital on Colorado Blvd.(on the Hospital grounds). I visited my aunt tonight at modern C.C. Young, now located on Lawther Drive, at the northwest end of White Rock Lake.
Holly,
Is your newly acquired Methodist history volume indexed? If so, I would be interested in knowing if it mentions Rev. Samuel Armstrong, a Methodist minister who moved to Dallas from Louisiana in about 1871. (He was the father of Mary Stevens, and grandfather of Walter and Annie L. Stevens, the founders of the Stevens Memorial Park,the golf course, and also developers of the Stevens Park Estates, Stevens Park Village, and Stevens Park Shopping Center.) Armstong was involved in the founding of the Floyd Street Methodist Church in East Dallas, later reorganized into Grace Methodist Church (which still contains a large stained glassed window donated by the Stevens family). Rev. Samuel Armstrong died in 1889. Also of interest would be a citation involving Dr. George C. Rankin. Rankin came to Dallas from Houston to be new head of the First Methodist Church downtown, and later became the head of the Methodist newspaper for Texas and the southwest region. A men's dormitory was named in his honor at S.M.U. after his death in 1915. Walter Armstrong Stevens married George C. Rankin's daughter, Laura. Rankin Park in West Dallas is named after one of his daughters, Hattie Rankin Moore.
Thanks,
Jim Barnes
Jim,
Sorry to be so late in responding.
The 'Texas Methodist Centennial Yearbook: 1834-1934,' contains only a few biographical sketches. Unfortunately, neither Rev. Samuel Armstrong or Dr. George C. Rankin are included in these.
There are several, small photographs of G. C. Rankin in the book. Dr. Rankin also is mentioned in "The Roll in Heaven." He is the information given for him:
Born...1849
Converted...1865
Licensed to Preach...1870
Entered Itinerancy...1874
Transferred into North Texas Conference...1876
Died...1915
Years of Ministry...41
Years in N. Texas Conference...19
Buried...Dallas
Rev. Sam. Armstrong's information in The Roll is as follows:
Born...1809
Converted...No Date Given
Licensed to Preach...No Date Given
Entered Itinerancy...1831
Transferred into North Texas Conference...1873
Died...1889
Years of Ministry...No Date Given
Years in North Texas Conference...17
Buried...Dallas
Several other ministers with the Armstrong and Rankin surnames are mentioned in these pages, as are other Dallas-area, Methodist clergy and laypersons of years gone by. Some local church statistics are included as well.
Hope this helps!
Holly
Holly -- what time period is covered by this volume? I am one the historians for our church, and am wondering if any of our early pastors might be mentioned. Thanks, Vivian
Holly,
Would your book have any information on Reverend O.C. Davis. He was a Methodist minister in Texas and after retiring wrote songs for the Stamps Quartet.
He was my husbands great great grandfather. I have scoured old hymnals for hymns that he wrote.
i have an old methodist hymnal here.
i will take a look and see if theres an index in there that lists his name.
debby
Holly,
Thanks so much for researching my questions and writing to me. I have printed out a copy of the information and tossed into my Stevens Family file folder. A couple of dates are new. I didn't have a year when Reverend Armstrong moved to Dallas. Your source gives the year as 1873, three years after his new son-in-law and daughter arrived here. It is impressive what good publishers and record keepers the early churches in Dallas were.
I appreciate your help.
Jim Barnes
Hi Davis,
I looked through some Stamps-Baxter hymnals that I have, but was unable to locate one of your husband's great-great-grandfather's compositions. An O. C. Davis is mentioned in the 'Texas Methodist Centennial Yearbook,' though. He is listed in the Chronological Roll of the Texas Annual Conference as having been ordained in 1923. Rev. Davis served the Kountze Circuit, and there is a little photograph of him in the volume as well.
Does this information appear to match what you know of your husband's great-great-grandfather, or perhaps, a more recent relative?
By the way, I am searching for information concerning a Reverend Davis who ministered in Fort Worth, ca. 1905.
Holly
Vivian,
This book begins with John Wesley's proclamation: "I look upon all the world as my parish," and forges ahead through Methodism's foundations in Texas during the 1830s, to its state and accomplishments at the century mark in this fair state (1934). Only the photographs of ministers, the few Historical Scetches, and "Various Schools, Historic Scenes and Events" are indexed. The volume is well-laid-out and easy to browse through, however. I'd be happy to search in it for specific information relating to your church or persons and institutions of interest. Just let me know.
Holly
PS. The faux-leather cover of this book is graced by the image of a curcuit rider -- "The Prophet of the Long Trail" -- and his faithful horse. Men like this and their congregations formed the backbone of our nation as it spread southwesterly.
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